Making & Shaping Tiger Rolls

September 24, 2020

Making & Shaping Tiger Rolls

With the classic cracked top and the fluffy interior, what better way to launch our Bread Baking Club than with a recipe for Tiger Rolls? Not only are these rolls tasty, but they will also introduce you to a few fun bread baking techniques along the way.

The dough for the Tiger Rolls is a fairly standard bread dough, however, it contains a tablespoon of oil, which gives you the opportunity to control the flavour of the bread. We’ve enjoyed trying different oils, and particularly enjoyed extra virgin olive oil (this gives a subtle Italian flavour), and sesame oil, which gives a more classic ‘tigery’ taste.

Once the dough is mixed, it's kneaded for about 10 minutes. We've got a handy dough kneading video below to help with this step:

The dough is then proved until doubled in size, and divided into 12 equal pieces. we've made the tiger rolls about a billion times (give or take), and we seem to have got no better at judging the weight of a piece of dough. We found it super hard to judge by eye if the pieces were equal, so we strongly advise weighing the dough and dividing the weight by 12 to ensure the rolls are of even size, and that they cook evenly in the oven.

Once the dough is divided, the rolls need to be shaped. Our recipe developer Liv had to teach us this technique, but it’s actually very simple. Roll each piece of dough into a ball, and tuck the edges underneath so that the top is smooth. With the smooth part of the roll against your palm, shape your hand like a claw around the roll and using a hard surface (or the flat palm of your other hand), roll the ball around in a circular motion to make the surface even smoother.

 

Once the rolls are shaped, they are left to prove again. Once this proof is complete, the tiger topping (a combination of water, oil, yeast, rice flour, sugar, and salt) is generously brushed onto the tops of the rolls.

 

This topping is what gives the Tiger Rolls their classic, cracked appearance - as the rice flour doesn’t contain gluten, it doesn’t stretch like normal flour would, and so dries and cracks as the rolls bake.

 

For a look at the whole process, see our ‘Tiger Rolls’ video.

We hope you enjoy making and eating these as your first Bakedin Bread Baking Club recipe! Don’t forget to post your pictures on the Bakedin Baking Club Facebook Group, #Bakedinbread.

Handy extras you may need for this bake:




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